California Divorce Attorney Undermines Couple's Efforts to Reach Agreement - Just Say No To Litigation

August 17, 2012, by

Sometimes, quite often in fact, the flames of conflict in divorce cases are fanned by attorneys who have more to gain from conflict than from resolution. Against my better judgment, I recently accepted a litigation case with the hope that perhaps I could help facilitate a negotiated settlement. It appeared to be a matter that could be settled with relative ease. During the negotiation process between the attorneys, the clients had a long talk, longer than they had had in years from what I was told, and agreed to put the matter on hold for some time to see if they might reconcile and resolve some of the disputed issues between them.

Upon hearing this, I was tentatively hopeful for both and provided my client with resources he might consider to help improve their communication and relationship and suggested that marital counseling may also be very helpful. And of course, a flower or two wouldn't hurt.
When my client's spouse told her attorney of their plans, her attorney responded with the statement, "Oh, so he wins," and grudgingly prepared a stipulation to continue the scheduled hearing out for a mere three months. I was horrified but not really surprised.
This is a marriage of nearly 40 years, a couple of retirement age with adult children and grandchildren and very moderate assets. Divorce in a situation like this should be a last resort only after some attempt at counseling as it is certain to result in considerable hardship for both. And after nearly 40 years, there is so much to savor and cherish if reconciliation succeeds.

I sent an inspirational photo and waited, hoping that the gods and goddesses of peace and love would prevail. Alas, it was to no avail. Reconciliation and healing of the relationship proved futile but the parties at least tried to reach a settlement of the issues between them and rather than supporting them in their efforts, the other attorney dismissed and undermined their efforts, and most shocking of all, the wife told her husband she was afraid to discuss their proposals with her attorney because her attorney would yell at her.

I have no idea why anyone would hire and pay fees to an attorney who would yell at them. And I later heard that the attorney put a lien on their house to collect her fees.

Lesson for me: Never underestimate people's proclivity for conflict and the tendency of attorney's to exacerbate the conflict to line their own pockets. Just say no to litigation.

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