Divorcing in California? Protect Your Children

Talk to your children about what is happening

Only a minority of divorcing parents sit down with their kids and explain that the marriage is ending and encourage them to ask questions. Some say nothing, surely leaving the kids totally confused and fearful. It is so important to talk to your kids, because almost without fail, they know something is wrong, they just don’t know what and that creates a great deal of anxiety. Tell them as simply as possible, what is happening and what it means to them and their lives. When parents don’t communicate this to the children, the kids feel anxious, upset and fearful and have a much more difficult time coping with the separation and divorce.

Be sensitive and thoughtful

Your children love both of their parents and need to hear about the situation in a way that honors their love for, and relationship with, each parent. If you must litigate, don’t leave court filings and documents out where they might be seen. Don’t talk to others about the issue in front on the children or where they might overhear. Kids are curious will often go to great lengths to hear what is going on and will sneak up on phone call and other conversations.

Act like a grown-ups and keep the conflict away from the kids

This is so important and has been repeated so often it has become ‘common knowledge’ and yet it still happens, parents will argue and fight in front of the children and even use them as spies or messengers. Put the children first and refuse to argue in front of them or subject them to your conflict in any way.

Ensure that Dad stays involved

Studies show that the more involved fathers are after separation and divorce, the better it is for the children. Work with your spouse or partner to develop a child-centered parenting plan that allows a continuing and meaningful relationship with both of you. Strong father-child relationships help children do better academically and become well-adjusted adults. Fathers need to be more than just the fun parent, they need to be helping and involved with school, homework, extracurricular activities and also be available emotionally and a co-partner in issues involving discipline.

Don’t act out of anger

Some parents, due to anger and pain, try to keep the other parent out of the kids’ lives. Divorcing spouses, angry and upset with the other often think the other parent is not good for the kids. But children’s and parents needs during divorce are very different. Researchers working with children of divorce consistently highlight that kids want more time with the non-custodial parent.

Be a good parent

It is OK to recognize, be present with, and work through the emotional pain you may feel. But you still need to be there for the children, both physically and emotionally. Competent parenting is one of the most important factors in helping children adjust well to separation and divorce.

Take care of your own mental health

Seek help for feelings of anger, anxiety, and sadness. Even a few meetings with a counselor or therapist can help and your own mental health is tremendously important for the well-being of your chidren. Generally, if you are OK, they will be OK.

Keep the people that are important to your children in their lives

Help your children stay involved with your spouse’s family and with friends. This will help your child feel they are not alone in the world, but have a deep and powerful support system – an important factor in becoming a psychologically healthy adult.

Be careful about your future love life

Give yourself a lot of time before you remarry or cohabit again. Especially for young children, forming new attachments to new partners where the relationship may then break up, just creates more loss. And this can lead to depression and a lack of trust generally. And older children need to be given time to learn to adjust to, respect and care for your new partner also.

Pay your child support

Even if you’re angry or have little time with your children, this is important. Children of divorce face much more economic instability than those from intact families even with child support. They might not notice or recognize the support when they are young but they will as they get older.